Next CCT Event

The Next Club Critical Theory event will be at this free conference on 27th April 2018 in Walton-on-the-Naze.

Here’s the new postcard to download – designed by Laetitia Zanga

A5 postcards-CMYK–Final_Version

Tickets and event information are here: https://www.uel.ac.uk/events/2018/03/essex-sea-side-conference

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About the conference
‘Resorting to the coast’ has been a national pastime since the Victorian period,
evolving to address demographic changes, greater mobility, fluctuating
levels of prosperity and competing leisure activities. The conference will
look at the current issues in the national debate around seaside coastal
resorts in relation to promoting their often unsung heritage. Specifically,
our focus will be on the Tendring coastal resorts of Dovercourt, Walton,
Frinton, Clacton and Jaywick Sands. Local history groups associated with
these resorts are heavily involved in archiving and promoting their seaside
heritage, but we ask whether this valued work is sufficient to attract new
visitors? In a world of uneven development, how does a resort set itself
apart from the competition? How do you unite as a coastal region when the
reality is you’re in competition with each other? Can lessons be drawn from
the past in order to resuscitate the ‘Great British Seaside Holiday’ as an
object of desire, or is it time to wipe the slate clean and start from scratch?

 

Next Event: 17th Nov 2017

Ahead of the first of two UEL organised conferences in Tendring next spring (See above- part of the Heritage Lottery funded Resorting to the Coast project), we are meeting to discuss notions of seaside culture.

Club Critical Theory present: Seaside Cultures
Fri 17th Nov 2017

8pm start upstairs at the Railway Hotel, Clifftown Rd, Southend-on-Sea SS1 1AJ. Free entry.

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In light of comedian Paul O’Grady’s widely publicised remarks about Southend, CCT invites you to discuss seaside cultures. Is the seaside an irrelevant Victorian concept in decline or does it still hold value? Are swanky galleries, expensive coffee bars and property development part of its appeal or can we actively shape an alternative culture in Southend?

Guest Speakers
Dr Daniel Burdsey (University of Brighton) investigates race, whiteness and the English seaside. In 2016 he published his second book, Race, Place and the Seaside: Postcards from the Edge (Palgrave Macmillan). Dan is interested in social and cultural aspects of the contemporary English seaside including migration and ‘new’ spaces of multiculture.
https://www.brighton.ac.uk/staff/daniel-burdsey.aspx
Dr Tim Gale (Bournemouth University) has published work that explores the decline and restructuring of British seaside resorts, new tourism spaces, places and experiences. These interests are underpinned by ideas associated with the ‘new mobilities paradigm’ and critical realism as a philosophy of/ for the social sciences.
http://staffprofiles.bournemouth.ac.uk/display/tgale
Panel discussion

Joanne O’Connor (Journalist and Travel Writer) is a former Observer travel editor and now freelances for the Guardian, Observer and FT. She has an interest in the arts, travel and regeneration. Born in Essex, and a regular visitor to Southend as a child, Joanne has recently returned to live in Essex.
https://www.theguardian.com/profile/joanneoconnor

Tim Burrows (Journalist and Author) writes about culture and place for publications including the Guardian, Vice and the Quietus. Recurring subjects in his work are Essex, the Thames Estuary and Essex myths, from Towie, Dr Feelgood and the “armpit of the world”. Tim lives in Essex.
https://www.theguardian.com/profile/tim-burrows

 

CCT are Giles Tofield (Cultural Engine), Andrew Branch (UEL) and Tony D Sampson (UEL)

 

Next Event: 10th June 2017

CCT_Artwork1CCT_Artwork

Next Event

Our next event will be a two day free conference at The Civic Centre in Southend on 15th and 16th Sept 2016.

Club Critical Theory: Essex Futures Conference

Venue: Civic Centre Southend-on-Sea, Committee Room 4a (close to Southend Victoria and Southend Central railway stations)

Dates: 15th-16th September, 2016

Club Critical Theory (CCT) host a free two day conference exploring ideas relevant to three public policy areas that have an impact on local communities within a national context

Keynote speakers

Robert Hewison (cultural historian and author of Cultural Capital: The Rise and Fall of Creative Britain)

Jack Monroe (writer, journalist and activist)

Matthew Taylor (Chief Executive of the RSA)

 

Day One: Thurs 15th Sept

Doors open 9.30am

Morning session 10am – 1pm

Introduction to CCT: Tony Sampson

Creative Industries and Entrepreneurialism: Exploring the drive by local authorities and other agencies to encourage growth in ‘creative sectors’. What impact is this really having on regional economies, and is it any more than simply ‘branding’?

Robert Hewison (Cultural Historian and author of The Rise and Fall of Creative Britain)

Joe Hill (Director of Focal Point Gallery)

Duncan Smith (Artistic Director of Association for Cultural Advancement through Visual Art)

Chair: Andrew Branch

Afternoon session 2-5pm

Food Cultures: Who is really setting the agenda in terms of policies on health and wellbeing in respect of what food we buy and consume? What can be done at a local level to improve ‘food cultures’ in the context of national policies which endorse a free market vision of society?

Vic Borrill (Director of Brighton and Hove Food Partnership)

Jack Monroe (Writer, Journalist and Activist)

Chair: Giles Tofield

Evening drinks at the Railway Hotel

Day Two: Fri 16th Sept

Doors open 9.30am

Morning session 10-1pm

Cultural Policy, Heritage and Place-Making: What do we mean by ‘place-making’ at a local level? Who creates the stories and narratives that define how our towns and cities are to be ‘branded’? Does local cultural policy (where it still exists) have a role to play in creating really distinctive identities and differences in a globalised world economy? How is local ‘heritage’ being used to promote new narratives of towns, cities and regions?

Matthew Taylor (Chief Executive of the RSA)

Scott Dolling (Head of Economy, Regeneration & Tourism, Southend Borough Council)

Robert Bean (Founder of Robert Bean Branding Co)

Chair: Giles Tofield

Closing remarks by Andrew Branch

Conference Funded by the University of East London

About the Organisers

Club Critical Theory (CCT) is a partnership between the University of East London (UEL) and Southend based social enterprise, The Cultural Engine. Established in 2014, CCT is a public engagement programme that seeks to encourage academics to get out into community spaces to explore how radical theory can inform the imaginative life of society.

CCT co-founders: Giles Tofield (The Cultural Engine), Dr Andrew Branch (UEL) and Dr Tony Sampson (UEL)

When Thursday, September 15, 2016 at 9:30 AM – Friday, September 16, 2016 at 1:00 PM (BST) – Add to Calendar Where The Civic Centre – Southend-on-Sea Essex

 

Details and registration are here:

https://www.eventbrite.com/e/club-critical-theory-essex-futures-conference-free-two-day-event-tickets-26582270286

 

 

 

Old Events

Club Critical Theory will be back in Southend late spring/early summer 2016

In the meantime

Postcard_ConwayHall

SPACE AND PROPAGATION: A CLUB CRITICAL THEORY SPECIAL AT CONWAY HALL

Book a place at the free event here

CCT open up a critical space for Conway Actants — an artistic and curatorial collaboration between Deborah Gardner and Jane Millar that directly responds to Conway Hall’s spaces, ethos, activities and archive.

Programme starts at 6.30pm with an introduction to Conway Actants by the artists:

INTRODUCTION TO CCT

Giles Tofield (The Cultural Engine)

CONWAY CONTAGIONS

Tony D Sampson 

Arts and Digital Industries (UEL)

ART FOR ALL

Andrew Branch

Arts and Digital Industries (UEL)

DISCUSSANTS 

Deborah Gardner and Jane Millar

 

 

Our next event is on Friday 4th Dec upstairs at the railway as usual.

Following on from our successful election special back in May (the club night, not the result), Club Critical Theory returns on Fri 4th Dec with a discussion that will no doubt mention Corbynmania.

More to follow

UPDATE

Next Club Critical Theory Event – Friday Dec 4th 8pm start upstairs at the Railway

media power and politics

Date: Friday, 04 December, 8.00pm start

Venue: Railway Hotel, Southend-on-Sea

media-general-election-morning-after-papers-7

Following the success of our election special, this CCT event explores how people make sense of the media they consume and how raising questions about the ownership and regulation of commercial and publicly-funded media can provide an insight into the agenda-setting processes they enact.

We ask whether the arrival of new forms of digital social media is a cause for optimism – because such forms appear to provide a genuine challenge to the vested interests of established media conglomerates – or merely provides an echo chamber for the already converted. Further, we consider these developments in relation to the history of alternative media forms and their deployment by marginalised social groups.

In summary, we address a fundamental question: do people believe everything they view and read?

Tracey Jensen (speaker)

A graduate of Cambridge University and the LSE, Tracey’s current teaching and research at the University of East London looks at how policy, media and cultural texts work together to produce and circulate stigmatising ideas of families ‘in crisis’, as ‘welfare dependent’ or ‘undisciplined’. She connects these ideas to a broader analysis of the ‘post-welfare’ shift, in which citizen entitlements are becoming contractual, precarious and sanctioned. At this CCT event Tracey will discuss the recent explosion of a new genre of reality television – known as ‘poverty porn’ – which forms part of a populist authoritarianism around welfare.

 

Michael Bailey (speaker)

Michael teaches at the University of Essex and is currently writing a book about public sociology. His interests in this field have led him to present lectures on ‘Globalisation, Anticapitalism and Associative Democracy’ at various international universities, particularly in China. Michael connects these interests to his broader commitment to critical theory; historical sociology; working-class heritage and sociology of the media and modern culture. AT CCT he will examine the history of alternative media forms and their legacies.

Andrew Calcutt (discussant)

‘Hackademic’ Andrew Calcutt was a journalist for 25 years before he became an academic at the University of East London. As a journalist, he worked in print (Arena, Esquire, Living Marxism/LM, the Modern Review), in broadcasting (Clarke TV for Channel4), and online (commissioning editor, Channel Cyberia for MSN). As a lecturer in journalism, his priorities are good copy and clear thinking. Andrew will draw on these experiences when identifying comparative and contrasting themes in both presentations in order to open the discussion.

CCT_3rdMay

CCT_3rdMay1

Where is the Common Ground? Making Local Activism Work in Southend

3rd May, 2015 at 8pm

Free entry

Upstairs at the Railway Hotel, Southend-on-Sea

www.railywayhotelsos.co.uk

The General Election on May 7th is occurring against a backdrop of relentless austerity, food poverty, tax evasion and scapegoating of groups without access to the mainstream media that marginalizes them.

Is there an alternative to this politics of despair, and if so, is collective activism the answer? Is Essex man Russell Brand right when he tells us that the system is broken and what we accept as ‘common sense’ has been imposed on us? On one hand, events in Greece and Spain show that collective responses to inequality are working. On the other hand, there is the anti-European, anti-immigration stance of populists like UKIP and Le Front National in France, whose appeal seems to resonate with the mythologized ‘man in the street’.

This pre-election CCT special event explores alternative ways of thinking critically about our everyday political lives and considers the effectiveness of collective activism. We’ll discuss what can be done at the local level to make a difference and what kind of differences ‘we’ want by first thinking about who ‘we’ are – a collective political force or fragmented individual consumers?

We ask you to contemplate the idea of the common ground and critically explore related concepts like neoliberalism, individuality, crowds, publics, multiplicities, collectivity, and of course, democracy.

Programme

8pm start

Introduction by Andrew Branch

8.10pm

Tony D. Sampson (author of Virality: Contagion Theory in the Age of Networks): Crowds, Publics and Desire.

8.30pm

Giles Tofield (Director of The Cultural Engine): Finding Common Ground – Southend.

8.50pm

Q&A Chaired by Andrew Branch followed by break for drinks

9.20pm

Special guest speaker Professor Jeremy Gilbert (author of Common Ground: Democracy and Collectivity in the Age of Individualism): The Common Ground

10pm

Discussion chaired by Andrew Branch

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The next CLUB CRITICAL THEORY event
Theorizing the Other: migration and cultural tourism
Thurs 4th December, 2014
8.30pm
Upstairs at the Railway Hotel, Southend-on-Sea, http://www.railwayhotelsos.co.uk
FREE ENTRY  
‘You were the first to teach us something absolutely fundamental: the indignity of speaking for others’ (Gilles Deleuze to Michel Foucault)
Joseph Conrad (6) copy

Joseph Conrad, Polish-born migrant to England and author of the Thames-set novella, Heart of Darkness

With increasingly xenophobic discourse framing political commentary in British mainstream media – cynically articulated this year by a privately educated ex-commodities broker passing himself off as a ‘man of the (common) people’ – to be labelled as ‘Other’ in the contemporary moment is to be read as inferior; a drain on national resources and a threat to the alleged homogeneity of the cultural practice of Britain’s indigenous population. Confusingly, the Other in many forms of popular culture is simultaneously fetishized as an object of desire, often for middle-class cultural tourists intent on indulging in ‘cheap holiday[s] in other people’s misery’ (John Lydon, 1977).This Club Critical Theory event will examine the processes by which the Other is identified and marked by engaging with the work of writers, Agata Pyzik and Sophia Deboick. Each will discuss this theme within their work by examining the ‘exotic’ appeal Eastern Europe held for David Bowie in the mid-seventies and the quasi-religious fervour with which the globalized fan-base of Depeche Mode continues to frame its utopian idealization of the group. In doing so, Agata and Sophia will invite us to explore both the roots and the routes by which the Other is marked and fixed in the public imagination, as both a source of fear and fascination.In order to provide some theoretical context for this event, we invite you to read Edward Said’s 2003 preface to his seminal 1977 book, Orientalism. A version is available here:http://www.odsg.org/Said_Edward%281977%29_Orientalism.pdfBiographiesAgata PyzikAgata Pyzik is a Polish journalist and author whose work has appeared in publications such as The Wire, The Guardian, New Statesman, New Humanist, Afterall and Frieze. She studied philosophy, art history, English and American studies in Warsaw and has interviewed some of the foremost contemporary leftist thinkers and art theoreticians, which provides context for her interest in contemporary forms of resistance and political aesthetics. Agata is the author of the highly acclaimed, Poor But Sexy: Culture Clashes in Europe East and West (Zero Books).Sophia DeboickSophia Deboick is a historian of religion and popular culture and a freelance writer. Her doctoral thesis looked at the role of images in the cult of Saint Thérèse of Lisieux in early twentieth-century France. Her broader interests include popular religion and sainthood, particularly in modern France and Poland. Sophia also has an interest in fan cults and pilgrimage, in both the sacred and secular contexts of Catholicism and popular music. She writes on history, religion and culture at The Guardian, The Quietus and elsewhere.Introduction: Giles TofieldChair: Andrew BranchDJ: Beardy AlLast event
ADI335 Club Critical Flyer2 v1-1_Page_1ADI335 Club Critical Flyer2 v1-1_Page_2
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Full details
Kursaal as Heterotopic Space
20th June 2014
8.30pm for a 9pm start
Upstairs at the Railway Hotel, Southend-on-Sea, http://www.railwayhotelsos.co.uk
FREE ENTRY “In the mirror, I see myself there where I am not, in an unreal, virtual space that opens up behind the surface; I am over there, there where I am not, a sort of shadow that gives my own visibility to myself, that enables me to see myself there where I am absent: such is the utopia of the mirror. But it is also a heterotopia in so far as the mirror does exist in reality, where it exerts a sort of counteraction on the position that I occupy. From the standpoint of the mirror I discover my absence from the place where I am since I see myself over there.” (Michel Foucault, 1967)The Kursaal was one of the world’s first amusement parks and the bank holiday destination for working Londoners between 1920s-1960s. During the 1970s it became a decaying music venue playing host to major rock acts. All that remains today is the Grade 2 listed main building with a distinctive stained glass dome.In this CCT event we approach the Kursaal as a ‘heterotopic’ space (Foucault, 1967) which holds up a mirror up to life in Southend; past and the present.Angie Voela: Academic (UEL)On the other side of the mirror: heterotopia in Foucault and contemporary culture Even the most dedicated Foucauldian would have to admit that his notion of heterotopia is at best schematic, unfinished and elliptical. Yet few ideas have captured the imagination of artists, activists, writers and scholars more than this one. What is it that makes heterotopia such a powerful notion? Why does it endure and what does it promise? I attempt to formulate a response to these questions by discussing instances of heterotopia in various fields of creative work and academic research, also discussing the limitations of existing critiques and, in many cases, their profound lack of engagement with Foucault’s larger ethic-aesthetic project.Jane Millar: Artist and Curator Kursaal: dream of the other This talk will engage with various critical theories, including Foucault’s heterotopia, to consider the fairground as a space of otherness, with more layers of meaning or relationships to other places than immediately meet the eye; as part of human geography. It will then introduce a project which aims to commission contemporary artists/makers to respond to the history and presence of the Kursaal. The talk will explore the site of the Kursaal and show the work of the artists involved in the show.The discussion will be chaired by Tony D Sampson (UEL)Guest DJ: “Twig the Wonder Kid” (11 till 1am)SpeakersAngie Voela is a senior lecturer in Psychosocial Studies, University of East London. She has published extensively on identity and gender in literature, film and theatre. She often draws on psychoanalysis, Foucault and French philosophy, and has a keen interest in space, theories of space and the spatial dimension of identity.Jane Millar is an artist, a lecturer in fine art and a curator. She studied painting at Canterbury College of Art, and completed an MA in Painting (Tapestry) at the Royal College of Art, in 1989. In 2012 she completed an MA in Education in Museums and galleries at the Institute of Education, London. Her interest and recent projects in curation are concerned with site specificity, place and audience development; where artists-as-researchers engage with/reveal both tangible and intangible content. Jane’s current role, as an associate research curator for A Fine Line, is to develop an exhibition of contemporary artists/makers to interpret the history and presence of The Kursaal Amusement Park, in Southend-On-Sea.clubcriticaltheory.wordpress.com/twitter.com/CCT_onSea
Kursaal

The first Club Critical Theory: making sense of place: creating a critical space for southend-on-sea

Date: 17th April

Time: 9pm

Heaths copy

Venue: Upstairs at the Railway Hotel, Clifftown Road, Southend On Sea (near to Southend Central Rail Station

RailwayHotel

Free entry

What’s Occurring…

Giles Tofield chairs this CCT discussion including introductions to Bourdieu’s habit (Andrew Branch, UEL) and Deleuze’s assemblages (Tony D Sampson, UEL).

Special Guest DJ: Stuart Bowditch

Stuart is mostly inspired by his love of open air, spaces and places. His interest in sound and the natural rhythms and routines of everyday life have shaped the methodology of his work, which revolves around noises and sounds which he finds, records and processes. He loves to travel, near and far, and the recordings he makes become a document, a sound memory, of his time spent in each place. He often works with individuals or groups to record new sets of sounds and over the years has built up a large archive of recordings which he draws upon to make songs, soundtracks to films and art installations. In this way of working he tries to make sense of the world he lives in and his place within it. Simultaneously, the creations and experiences of others end up intrinsically embedded in his work, creating a rich texture of layers, representing his life and those he as encountered along the way.

9-9.20pm: Sounds by Stuart Bowditch

9.20-9.30pm: Introduction to CCT by Giles Tofield (Chair)

The Talks

9.30pm

Deleuze, Contagion & the New Brighton
Tony D Sampson (UEL)

This talk will engage with the ideas of Gilles Deleuze in order to grasp how urban space, place and time might emerge. Firstly, we need to rethink the idea of Southend as a holistic entity (e.g. Southend as a whole community) and instead encounter the urban space as a multiplicity. The focus therefore needs to shift away from wholes and essential properties to consider local interactions and singularities that have the capacity and tendency to spill over into urban space (for good and bad). The talk will include a collaborative venture with the photographer Iry Hor whose work captures the assemblages of real Southend.

10-10.15pm: short break

10.15pm

Bourdieu, Habit and Social Space
Andrew Branch (UEL)

Morrissey once asked ‘When you want to live, how do you start? Where do you go? Who do you need to know? This talk will answer these political questions by illustrating how Pierre Bourdieu’s work can illuminate our understanding of how habitual behaviour forms, structures our sense of entitlement and frames our occupation of space and place. Using examples familiar to people living in Southend and its adjacent areas, the talk will conclude by exploring how transformation occurs, both at the individual and collective level.

10.45-11.00: short break

11.00-11.30: Discussion We welcome your contributions

11.30-til late: Sounds by Stuart Bowditch

External Links

AndrewBranch

Virality

CCT Banner photograph by Simon Fowler

Social Media: https://clubcriticaltheory.wordpress.com/; Twitter: @CCT_onSea https://twitter.com/CCT_onSea

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5 thoughts on “Next CCT Event

  1. Pingback: club critical theory (southend-on-sea)
  2. Pingback: Links to text versions of the Making Sense of Place talks from CCT April 17th 2014 | club critical theory (southend-on-sea)

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